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  • Most Topular Stories

  • The Art of the Business Model

    Guy Kawasaki
    Guy Kawasaki
    24 Feb 2015 | 3:03 pm
    A good business model forces you to answer two simple questions: “Who has your money in their pockets?” And “How are you going to get it into your pocket?” These questions may lack subtlety, but making money isn’t a subtle process. More elegantly stated, the first question involves identifying your customer and the need that she feels. The second question creates a sales mechanism to ensure that your revenues exceed your costs. You’ll tweak your business model constantly–in fact, it’s scary if you don’t change your model or do some major tweaking along the way. Here are some…
  • The Art of Simple Questions: How Simple Questions Lead to Great Innovations

    Guy Kawasaki
    Guy Kawasaki
    3 Mar 2015 | 7:00 am
    There is a myth that successful companies begin with grandiose ambitions. The implication is that entrepreneurs should start with megalomaniac goals in order to succeed. To the contrary, my observation is that great companies began by wondering about simple things, and this leads to asking simple questions that beget companies: Therefore, what? This question arises when you spot or predict a trend and wonder about its consequences. It works like this: “Everyone will have a smartphone with a camera and Internet access.” Therefore, what? “They will be able to take pictures and share…
  • How to not self-destruct

    Penelope Trunk Careers
    Penelope Trunk
    27 Feb 2015 | 4:51 pm
    A famous person emailed me to ask about personality type. I don’t get a lot of emails from famous people. But I do get some. Like, when Melissa was being an executive assistant to billionaires, I was Melissa’s reference. I could write fifty posts about giving those references, actually, because I was like, “Don’t hire Melissa, because she’ll quit. She can’t work for anyone for more than a year.” But the thing about famous people is they think they are different. Well, I mean, they are different. They are famous, right? So they think the rules of working with Melissa…
  • The Only 10 Slides You Need in Your Pitch

    Guy Kawasaki
    Guy Kawasaki
    5 Mar 2015 | 6:00 am
    I am evangelizing the 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint. It’s quite simple: a pitch should have ten slides, last no more than twenty minutes, and contain no font smaller than thirty points.This rule is applicable for any presentation to reach agreement: for example, raising capital, making a sale, forming a partnership, etc. Ten slides. Ten is the optimal number of slides in a PowerPoint presentation because a normal human being cannot comprehend more than ten concepts in a meeting—and venture capitalists are very normal. (The only difference between you and venture capitalist is that he…
  • Welcome Jay Ohms, programmer

    Signal vs. Noise
    Jason Z.
    2 Mar 2015 | 8:54 am
    Today we’re excited to announce the latest addition to the Basecamp team: Jay Ohms joins us as our lucky 13th programmer. He’ll be working with our mobile team on Basecamp for Android. Android enthusiasts will know Jay as the one part of the duo behind Press, the popular Android RSS reader. Press arrived at a time when great design was hard to find on the platform. Jay’s focus on quality and eye for detail made Press a favorite and caught our attention, too. After spending a week working with our Chicago-based Android team on a trial project we knew Jay, who also happens to live in…
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    Penelope Trunk Careers

  • How to not self-destruct

    Penelope Trunk
    27 Feb 2015 | 4:51 pm
    A famous person emailed me to ask about personality type. I don’t get a lot of emails from famous people. But I do get some. Like, when Melissa was being an executive assistant to billionaires, I was Melissa’s reference. I could write fifty posts about giving those references, actually, because I was like, “Don’t hire Melissa, because she’ll quit. She can’t work for anyone for more than a year.” But the thing about famous people is they think they are different. Well, I mean, they are different. They are famous, right? So they think the rules of working with Melissa…
  • Finding a mate isn’t luck. It’s about setting a goal and reaching it.

    Penelope Trunk
    22 Feb 2015 | 11:36 pm
    Photographer Dita Pepe has a series of photographs where she shows what she’d turn into with the different types of men she could could have married. The series is often hilarious for it’s ability to make fun of such a wide range of families that think they’re unique but are actually just living out their socioeconomic telos. But there’s also a poignancy to the photos, because it’s almost as if the woman in the photos has no control over her own destiny. Love is fickle and unpredictable and whoever she falls in love with determines the rest of her life. Which is…
  • Your job will be good if you have a friend at work

    Penelope Trunk
    18 Feb 2015 | 11:01 am
    As a bulimic in college, the cafeteria was my focal point. At first, it was where I gained fifteen pounds. Not that anyone saw those pounds on me. In college I had the body of a model. Not that anyone saw that, either, because I wore an A-line skirt down to my ankles and an extra-large sweatshirt. Every day. A guy once asked me if I was an Orthodox Jew because I was so covered up all the time. I thought he was an idiot. That’s how big an idiot I was. I taught myself to throw up without a mentor. I just read about it, somewhere, when there was no Internet and definitely no one talked to…
  • How to balance your business and your family

    Penelope Trunk
    4 Feb 2015 | 2:31 pm
    Some days I am gung ho about entrepreneurship and I’m spending the day with my kids while money comes in from my blog and my coaching and I think “I’m great, I’m living the 4-hour workweek,” and for one minute I forget that I hate Tim Ferriss. I hate him for making people think that it is possible for anyone to make money without working hard. Because the next minute, I am telling my husband that I promise I’ll pay him back and I’m paying my developer for my startup with money earmarked for corn, and I’m in therapy from the stress of knowing…
  • Career trajectory of the fast-rising star

    Penelope Trunk
    28 Jan 2015 | 4:03 pm
    My husband tells me that when the tractor was invented, farmers who spent their lives learning to be great with horses had to rely on young farmers who understood machinery. It was an era when young people looked like experts in farming almost overnight. Or at least they felt that way. Really, though, they were experts in the machinery of farming, but machinery so quickly became a focal point of farming that being an expert in machinery meant you could get by. For a while. Until a drought. Or a flood. Or until you need to earn a lot more money to support your family. This is the best…
 
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    Guy Kawasaki

  • The Only 10 Slides You Need in Your Pitch

    Guy Kawasaki
    5 Mar 2015 | 6:00 am
    I am evangelizing the 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint. It’s quite simple: a pitch should have ten slides, last no more than twenty minutes, and contain no font smaller than thirty points.This rule is applicable for any presentation to reach agreement: for example, raising capital, making a sale, forming a partnership, etc. Ten slides. Ten is the optimal number of slides in a PowerPoint presentation because a normal human being cannot comprehend more than ten concepts in a meeting—and venture capitalists are very normal. (The only difference between you and venture capitalist is that he…
  • The Art of Simple Questions: How Simple Questions Lead to Great Innovations

    Guy Kawasaki
    3 Mar 2015 | 7:00 am
    There is a myth that successful companies begin with grandiose ambitions. The implication is that entrepreneurs should start with megalomaniac goals in order to succeed. To the contrary, my observation is that great companies began by wondering about simple things, and this leads to asking simple questions that beget companies: Therefore, what? This question arises when you spot or predict a trend and wonder about its consequences. It works like this: “Everyone will have a smartphone with a camera and Internet access.” Therefore, what? “They will be able to take pictures and share…
  • Top 10 Ways to Capture Attention

    Guy Kawasaki
    2 Mar 2015 | 7:16 am
    This is a guest post by Ben Parr, the author of Captivology. You probably deal with attention issues every day. How do I get the attention of new customers? How do I retain the attention of existing clients? How do I captivate my boss or my upcoming date? It’s a hard problem to solve, especially since very few people understand how attention fundamentally works. Writing my new book Captivology: The Science of Capturing People’s Attention, I combed through more than a thousand research studies and interviewed dozens of scientists, PhDs, business leaders, and luminaries to understand why we…
  • The Meaning of Meaning

    Guy Kawasaki
    1 Mar 2015 | 10:39 pm
    When I was a venture capitalist, I noticed that entrepreneurs whose primary goal was to make money usually failed. This is because this kind of entrepreneur attracts other people who want to make money, and then when the company doesn’t pay out big bucks immediately (and no startup does), these folks look for greener pastures. To combat the problem of ill-suited people pursuing entrepreneurship, experts often recommend rigorous self-examination before starting a company. However, most people  ask themselves the wrong questions: Can I work long hours at low wages? Can I deal with…
  • The Art of the Business Model

    Guy Kawasaki
    24 Feb 2015 | 3:03 pm
    A good business model forces you to answer two simple questions: “Who has your money in their pockets?” And “How are you going to get it into your pocket?” These questions may lack subtlety, but making money isn’t a subtle process. More elegantly stated, the first question involves identifying your customer and the need that she feels. The second question creates a sales mechanism to ensure that your revenues exceed your costs. You’ll tweak your business model constantly–in fact, it’s scary if you don’t change your model or do some major tweaking along the way. Here are some…
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    Signal vs. Noise

  • Welcome Jay Ohms, programmer

    Jason Z.
    2 Mar 2015 | 8:54 am
    Today we’re excited to announce the latest addition to the Basecamp team: Jay Ohms joins us as our lucky 13th programmer. He’ll be working with our mobile team on Basecamp for Android. Android enthusiasts will know Jay as the one part of the duo behind Press, the popular Android RSS reader. Press arrived at a time when great design was hard to find on the platform. Jay’s focus on quality and eye for detail made Press a favorite and caught our attention, too. After spending a week working with our Chicago-based Android team on a trial project we knew Jay, who also happens to live in…
  • VIDEO: Did y’all know you can share stuff…

    Shaun
    27 Feb 2015 | 2:55 pm
    Did y’all know you can share stuff directly to Basecamp from apps like Paper? Resident illustrator, Nate Otto shows it off.
  • Behind the scenes: From Herding Cats to Finishing a Project Together

    Jamie
    27 Feb 2015 | 9:53 am
    Nate Otto and I made a new Basecamp homepage illustration based on a vector drawing I made in Adobe Illustrator. Initially I didn’t intend it to be hand drawn. I thought I’d refine the vector drawing. Somewhere in the middle it turned into “herding cats”. In the end the spirit of the concept was intact, but the result very different from what I’d envisioned. Here’s how we got to the final idea: Basecamp helps you wrangle people with different roles, responsibilities, and objectives toward a common goal: Finishing a project together. First pass: Basecamp is…
  • Solo

    Nate Otto
    20 Feb 2015 | 1:31 pm
    About five years ago I consciously willed an art career into existence. At that point I had been working a social services job for about five years. I initially took the job because it wasn’t specifically art related. It was a job I could feel good about — helping people with disabilities — but it wouldn’t tap my creative juices. I had learned many years before when I got a job doing graphic design that being creative at work drained my creative life bars during my down time. This social services job would leave me with enough creative energy to work on my art when I got home, but in…
  • When Disaster Strikes

    Taylor
    19 Feb 2015 | 11:16 am
    Nearly 3 years ago we asked “What would happen if a truck crashed into the datacenter?” The resulting discussion could be summarized as “Well we would probably be offline for days, if not weeks or months. We wouldn’t have many happy customers by the time Basecamp was back online.” No one was satisfied with that answer and, in fact, we were embarrassed. So we worked really hard to be prepared with an answer that made us proud. This past Sunday, February 15th 2015, we demonstrated that answer in public. With one command we moved Basecamp’s live traffic out of…
 
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    blog maverick

  • Why This Tech Bubble is Worse Than the Tech Bubble of 2000 – Part 2

    CyberDust ID - Blogmaverick
    5 Mar 2015 | 12:04 pm
    Since a few people seem to be freaking out that I limited my example of those being subject to the bubble in private investments to Angels and Crowdfunding, I decided to do a part 2. They were right. I should have been clearer on just how extensive the abuse and impact of this bubble is. Lets change it to a question. How many people have been pitched an app that is going to be the next …….. How many people have been pitched to invest in that app ? Has anyone not been pitched investing in an app ? There are more than 1.3mm app in each of the 2 main stores. That excludes the dead…
  • Why This Tech Bubble is Worse Than the Tech Bubble of 2000

    CyberDust ID - Blogmaverick
    4 Mar 2015 | 2:38 pm
    Ah the good old days.  Stocks up $25, $50, $100 more in a single day.  Day trading was all the rage.  Anyone and everyone you talked to had a story about how they had made a ton of money on such and such a stock. In an hour.  Stock trading millionaires were being minted by the week, if not sooner. You couldn’t go anywhere without people talking about the stock market.  Everyone was in or new someone who was in. There were hundreds of companies that were coming public and could easily be bought and sold.  You just pick a stock and buy it. Then you pray it goes up. Which most days…
  • The Worlds First Streaming Radio Station and First Live Sporting Events on the Net

    CyberDust ID - Blogmaverick
    15 Jan 2015 | 9:59 pm
    AudioNet http://www.Audionet.Com 1-800-34AUDIO AudioNet & KLIF 570 Announce The First FullTime SimulNetCast Radio Station on the Net For Immediate Release Friday, September 1st 1995 Contact:     Mark Cuban AudioNet Direct:214-696-3320 [Dallas]…AudioNet, the world’s first audio network on the Internet, and KLIF 570AM, Dallas, are pleased to announce that on September 1st, 1995, KLIF became the first radio station in the world to begin broadcasting their original programming simultaneously over the air, and over the Internet. Beginning with the broadcast of the Southern…
  • Is this a proposal from 1995 or 2015 ?

    CyberDust ID - Blogmaverick
    15 Jan 2015 | 9:47 pm
    I had reason to do some research and find some old goodies from the beginning of the world of streaming. This was first written in 1995 with testimonial emails added over time. Since 2015 marks the 20th Anniversary year of streaming, i thought it would be fun for you to see that our proposals from back then aren’t a whole lot different from what we see in proposals today. The technology has improved. The market has changed. The proposition. Not so much.  Ok maybe I had to explain what the Internet is and that’s not necessary today. But why nitpick Notice towards the end the offer…
  • My Conversation with Business Insider about Net Neutrality

    CyberDust ID - Blogmaverick
    16 Nov 2014 | 12:13 pm
    Hey Mark, A few things that stood out from your recent string of Tweets: Yes, broadband speed and quality have gotten better. But it’s still behind the most of the developed world. We pay a lot more on average for slower speeds on average. The overarching problem is that there is no competition among ISPs. They each have monopolies where they operate. That in turn gives them little incentive to provide better service, invest in infrastructure, and so on. In fact investment in those things have declined over the last four years. Allowing ISPs to compete would be wonderful, but…
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    Matt Mullenweg

  • WIRED Re-launch

    Matt
    4 Mar 2015 | 6:36 pm
    There’s the smart publishers, and then there’s the ones going out of business. WIRED is one of the smart ones, and just launched an awesome redesign on WordPress. From their editor-in-chief: Back in 1994 we launched Hotwired, the first site with original editorial content created for the web. It was a digital home for reporting on the future of science, business, design, and technology. You’ve come to trust us over the past two decades, but our growth online has sometimes come too quickly and with some pain. When I took over as editor in chief in 2012, WIRED had an archive of…
  • WordPress iOS WYSIWYG

    Matt
    3 Mar 2015 | 8:31 pm
    It’s been a long road, but the WordPress mobile apps are finally making some major strides. WordPress iOS version 4.8 includes a visual editor so you won’t see code anymore when blogging on the go. (For anyone curious at home, WordPress originally shipped with WYSIWYG in version 2.0, and it was highly controversial at the time.)
  • Pink and Blue

    Matt
    2 Mar 2015 | 8:06 am
    A June 1918 article from the trade publication Earnshaw’s Infants’ Department said, “The generally accepted rule is pink for the boys, and blue for the girls. The reason is that pink, being a more decided and stronger color, is more suitable for the boy, while blue, which is more delicate and dainty, is prettier for the girl.” Other sources said blue was flattering for blonds, pink for brunettes; or blue was for blue-eyed babies, pink for brown-eyed babies, according to Paoletti. Did you know pink and blue implying gender is relatively new, and all babies used to just wear…
  • Text as Interface

    Matt
    1 Mar 2015 | 9:11 am
    Great piece by Jonathan Libov on text-based messaging interfaces for everything in the future, it’s like the command line has come alive again.
  • Watching Television

    Matt
    28 Feb 2015 | 7:43 pm
    It wasn’t that long ago, in the grand scheme of things, that I didn’t have any TV shows I was actively watching. Life has been busier than ever, but I’ve started catching up with shows instead of movies when flying. I’ve been blown away by the high quality of storytelling  in the medium of television right now. So I find myself actively watching a few different shows: House of Cards (new season out today!). True Detective. Scandal. Blacklist. Empire. West Wing. There are some guilty pleasures in there, and there are probably a dozen shows that friends have…
 
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    Trends... Find them, ride them and get off.

  • Nasdaq 5,000 …Finally the Nasdaq Passes my Cholesterol Level

    Howard Lindzon
    4 Mar 2015 | 8:24 am
    In March 2000, the last time we hit 5,000 on the Nasdaq, my kids were 1 and 2. They were perfect and I can’t believe I am so lucky they remain so. I had a quotron and paid for real time stock prices. I had a Nokia phone. I had never heard of Ambien. CNBC sucked. I was an 8 handicap. I weighed 190 pounds. In the 15 years since, only my golf handicap and CNBC have not changed. I’m an 8 handicap with better equipment and CNBC sucks. Stock prices have changed wildly as have the leaders of the Nasdaq. The MOST important change in the markets is a wider, deeper and wonderful…
  • Millennials, Millennials, Millennials…and Goldman Sachs as Buzzfeed

    Howard Lindzon
    1 Mar 2015 | 4:51 pm
    Goldman Sachs has their eyes set finally on Millennials. They have this ‘Coming of Age‘ set of trends that they recently published. They do not like to share information publicly without a reason that benefits them. To be honest, there is nothing actionable for public market investing from the infographics. The Washington Post actually has this millennial myth debunking piece. Nike (long), UnderArmour (long), Disney, Netflix (long), Apple (long) and Google (long) have been and will continue to be the public market winners of this millennial financial phenomenon because they…
  • Kill all the Economists…and Remember YahooBaba and BabaHoo?

    Howard Lindzon
    25 Feb 2015 | 8:22 am
    Markets around the world are breaking out to major highs: The FTSE in London The DAX in Germany The S&P in the USA The Nikkei in Japan The Nasdaq has closed higher for 11 straight days. The last time that happened was 1992. Those years ahead were good my friends: ChOTD-2/25/15 #2) Nasdaq Composite 9 Straight Closes > Open 1992-2015 QQQ COMPQ http://stks.co/q1ZTL — Dana Lyons (@JLyonsFundMgmt) Feb. 25 at 05:11 AM These ‘all-time highs’ are wonderful for people that own stocks and trend followers …like me. Apple, Nike, UnderArmor, Resmed are stocks of mine that…
  • If The Stock Market had The Oscar’s…I Would Like to Thank the Bull Market and the God of Fear and Greed….

    Howard Lindzon
    23 Feb 2015 | 8:41 am
    I have long wanted to have an ESPY’s for Financial Markets. If you want to help with this project, please get in touch with me. If I had to give two Academy Awards for ‘bad acting’ in a the the markets in 2014 they would go the bankers (Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley) who brought Castlight Health (CSLT) public and Janet Yellen for yelling ‘fire’ in a crowded room full of Biotech investors. Here is the Castlight Health IPO: CSLT THE favorite short of 2014/15 $7 pr. target now achieved —> http://stks.co/d1jgC ZU COUP FUEL BOX STUDY http://stks.co/f1oEK…
  • The State of The Markets in 2015….The Bears Have Been Lucky and The Public Ripped Off Again

    Howard Lindzon
    22 Feb 2015 | 8:47 am
    My friend Niv put together this excellent post ‘When Exponential Progress Becomes Reality‘ it is worth a full read. For my market brain this is the most important part: Human perception is linear, technological progress is exponential. Our brains are hardwired to have linear expectations because that has always been the case. Technology today progresses so fast that the past no longer looks like the present, and the present is nowhere near the future ahead. Then seemingly out of nowhere, we find ourselves in a reality quite different than what we would expect. This is why I poke…
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    Calacanis.com

  • Took a year, but I think we figured out mobile news: Inside 3.0

    Jacqui
    25 Feb 2015 | 10:35 pm
    It’s taken me a year of iteration on Inside.com, but I think my team and I have figured out mobile news. This team of 14 full-timers and 50 writers has been crushing it for the last four months, building out our 3.0 product. It’s awesome. Please download it and let me know what you think. 3.0 is on iOS this month, Android next. [ Click to Tweet (can edit before sending): http://ctt.ec/Pc2d7 ] Our BHAG* is to curate the world’s best news and get people to the truth quicker [ * big hairy audacious goal ] We believe there will be a new class of content creators online. They’re not…
  • “Why the F@#$K is Glenn Beck coming to LAUNCH Festival?”

    Jacqui
    24 Feb 2015 | 3:14 pm
    I’ve gotten this question a couple of times since we announced that Glenn will be sitting down with me. I don’t know Glenn’s entire colorful history, and his coming to the event is not me endorsing — or not endorsing — his positions. My goal is to have amazing conversations about the future with people who are helping shape it. Glenn is one of those folks. [ Click to Tweet (can edit before sending): http://ctt.ec/D41IM ] In fact, Glenn represents tens of millions of people who live between New York, L.A., and San Francisco. Those people in the heartland want to know what…
  • Awesome eight apps contest!

    Jacqui
    23 Feb 2015 | 12:45 pm
    We’re running a contest to win one of 100 Builder Passes, 10 VIP Tickets, and one coveted Super VIP pass to the LAUNCH Festival. Here is how it works: a) Download any 8 of the 12 following Apps (I’m investors in them!) b) Place them on one screen on your phone & take a screenshot, like this: c) Tweet that image with: “Eight awesome apps to @launchfestival http://goo.gl/wkeBpU” We will pick random winners every day until Sunday at 1pm! [ Click to Tweet (can edit before sending): http://ctt.ec/f3T6I ] Inside.com: My curated news app! For iOS & Android. Connect.com: Our 2014…
  • If you want to come in first, aim for second

    Jacqui
    22 Feb 2015 | 10:19 pm
    My partner on Weblogs, Inc., Brian Alvey, wrote a solid blog post about me being a “fast follower” with a lot of the products in my career. It’s a fair assessment of not only me, but of the long list of folks who are a magnitude more successful than me! YouTube, Facebook, and Google were the 10th to 25th iteration on video, social networks, and search. Does that take anything away from Chad, Zuck, or Larry/Sergey? Not in my mind. Getting it *right* is what matters, not getting there first. [ Click to Tweet (can edit before sending): http://ctt.ec/8gT7I ] Even the mighty Apple was…
  • Be the sponge, not the rock

    Jacqui
    20 Feb 2015 | 10:05 pm
    My pal Adeo asked me a prescient question today: which would I rather invest in: a) a solid team with deep experience in a vertical, or b) a supremely talented team who doesn’t have a lot of domain experience. “I prefer investing in the sponge, not the rock,” I told him. The problem with people who have a ton of experience in a vertical is that they bring a ton of bias, as well. So, for every “I have a perfect person we can hire to do X!” you get two or three “I’ve been doing this for 20 years — trust me, this is how it is done!” [ Click to Tweet (can edit before…
 
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    The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss » Blog

  • The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly of CrossFit

    Tim Ferriss
    4 Mar 2015 | 3:56 pm
    This post delves into the good, the bad, and the ugly of all things CrossFit.  It answers many important questions, including: - What are the 3 most dangerous exercises in CrossFit gyms? – What are the most common nutritional mistakes of CrossFit athletes? – What do elite CrossFit athletes do differently than the rest? Example: How do Rich Froning and Jason Khalipa warm up? – Is the CrossFit Games really CrossFit? – Is CrossFit a fad? – What is the future of CrossFit? The man to answer all this (and much more) is Kelly Starrett.  He’s trained CrossFit…
  • Productivity Secrets of a Master DJ (Meditation, Morning Routines, and More)

    Ian Robinson
    23 Feb 2015 | 2:16 pm
    (Photo: Ralph Arvesen) Justin Boreta is a founding member of The Glitch Mob. Their music has been featured in movies like Sin City II, Edge of Tomorrow, Captain America, and Spiderman. In this post, we discuss The Glitch Mob’s path from unknown band to playing sold-out 90,000-person (!) arenas.  We delve into war stories, and go deep into creative process, including never-before-heard “drafts” of blockbuster tracks!  Even if you have zero interest in music, Justin discusses habits and strategies that can be applied to nearly anything.  Meditation?  Morning…
  • Matt Mullenweg on Polyphasic Sleep, Tequila, and Building Billion-Dollar Companies

    Ian Robinson
    9 Feb 2015 | 2:22 pm
    Matt Mullenweg has been named one of PC World’s Top 50 People on the Web, Inc.com’s 30 under 30, and Business Week’s 25 Most Influential People on the Web. In this episode, I attempt to get him drunk on tequila and make him curse. Matt is most associated with a tool that powers more than 22% of the entire web: WordPress. Even if you aren’t into tech, there are many pages of “holy shit!” tips and resources in this episode. Matt is a phenom of hyper-productivity and does A LOT with very little. But how? This conversation shares his best tools and tricks. From…
  • Tim Ferriss Interviews Arnold Schwarzenegger on Psychological Warfare (And Much More)

    Ian Robinson
    2 Feb 2015 | 2:20 am
    In this episode, I interview the one and only Arnold Schwarzenegger… at his kitchen table. First off, he wants to invite you to LA to blow sh*t up with him in person. Seriously. Here’s how. In our conversation, we dig into lessons learned, routines, favorite books, and much more, including many stories I’ve never heard anywhere else.  I’m also giving away amazing goodies for this episode, so be sure to read this entire post. As a starting point, we cover: The Art of Psychological Warfare, and How Arnold Uses It to Win How Twins Became His Most Lucrative Movie…
  • How to Create a Blockbuster Podcast

    Ian Robinson
    28 Jan 2015 | 11:56 pm
    “What makes ‘good tape’? That is the question that has consumed my life for the past 20 years, and I have an answer for you…” – Alex Blumberg How do you create a blockbuster podcast? This episode explores the tips, tricks, and best practices of a master. My guest is Alex Blumberg, who cut his teeth on the king of all radio shows (This American Life) and recently co-founded Gimlet Media. Gimlet swiftly conquered the iTunes rankings with two blockbuster podcasts: Reply All and StartUp. Podcasters everywhere asked: how the hell does he do it?   This…
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    Seth Godin's Blog on marketing, tribes and respect

  • Samples and shipping and more

    Seth Godin
    5 Mar 2015 | 8:31 am
    Here's an audio excerpt from the download/CD program I recently released via SoundsTrue as a fundraiser for Acumen. (Also on Amazon). I hope it resonates with you: Listen to The comparison trap from Leap First by Seth Godin Listen to Unleash the demos from Leap First by Seth Godin And, in response to many requests from people who love the fast (and sometimes free) shipping that Amazon offers, we've decided to now offer the two-pack of Your Turn on their site as well. (Click on "see all buying options" to get the 2 pack offer).  To get us off to a good start, it's discounted for…
  • The asymmetry of decay

    Seth Godin
    5 Mar 2015 | 2:01 am
    When things get a little better every day, we take the good news for granted. It takes almost no time at all for the improvement to turn into an expectation and for the expectation to be taken for granted. But when things decay, we can't stop thinking about the loss, extrapolating the pattern all the way to doom, and then living with that doom, long before it arrives. This is a bug in the system of our culture, but that doesn't mean we can't work to hack it. When we curate our media intake (and create our own) and when we decide what story to tell ourselves (instead of accepting the story of…
  • Labor unions in a post-industrial age

    Seth Godin
    4 Mar 2015 | 2:00 am
    The us/them mindset of the successful industrialist led to the inevitable and essential creation of labor unions. If, as Smith and Marx wrote, owning the means of production transfers maximum value to the factory owner, the labor union provided a necessary correction to an inherently one-sided relationship. Industrialism is based on doing a difficult thing (making something) ever cheaper and more reliably. The union movement is the result of a group of workers insisting that they be treated fairly, despite the fact that they don't own the means of production. Before globalism, unions had the…
  • The circus is coming to town

    Seth Godin
    3 Mar 2015 | 2:12 am
    Too often, we wait. We wait to get the gig, or to make the complex sale, or to find the approval we seek. Then we decide it's time to get to work and put on our show. The circus doesn't work that way. They don't wait to be called. They show up. They show up and sell tickets. When you transform the order of things, the power shifts. "The circus is going to be here tomorrow, are you going?" That's a very different question than, "are you willing to go out on a limb and book the circus? If you are, we'll come to town..." People respond to forward motion. Auctions are always more exciting than…
  • Stupid is the brand killer

    Seth Godin
    2 Mar 2015 | 2:00 am
    When you make your customer feel stupid, you've given him no choice. He needs to blame you. Some ways to make people feel stupid: Charge different prices at different outlets and shrug your shoulders when you get found out. Insist that the warranty ends precisely the day you said it would.  Give new customers a great discount for signing up, but tell long-term customers that they're out of luck. Make your expensive items less networked, less powerful and less reliable than your cheaper ones. Give your customers a product, idea or service that causes them to be ridiculed or shamed by…
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    AVC

  • A Focus On The Company Not The Investment

    Fred Wilson
    5 Mar 2015 | 7:08 am
    I said something on stage at Launch yesterday that I’d like to elaborate on: “Great VCs care more about the company than their investment.” -@fredwilson @Launch #launch2015 — Red Clay (@redclayco) March 4, 2015 I do not mean that your investment isn’t important and I do not mean that making money isn’t the focus of a venture capital firm and a venture capital investor. Both are absolutely true. However, I believe if you are invested in a startup at an early stage that goes on to become a “great company”, that your investment is going to work out…
  • Some Thoughts On Watches

    Fred Wilson
    4 Mar 2015 | 5:55 am
    One of my most controversial predictions at year end was: The Apple Watch will not be the homerun product that iPod, iPhone, and iPad have been. Not everyone will want to wear a computer on their wrist. With the Pebble Time making records on Kickstarter this month, with the iWatch coming soon, and with a host of Android powered watches coming to market, it sure feels like the “watch moment” in tech. However, I continue to think that these computers on your wrist are not going to be a mainstream thing. Monday night we went out to dinner with a bunch of tech investors in LA. Not…
  • The Blockchain Market Map

    Fred Wilson
    3 Mar 2015 | 9:04 am
    Four hours ago I left my house for the airport and was planning to blog on the flight to SF this morning. But things got in the way of that. First the pilot didn’t show. Then when he did the computer systems went down at LAX grounding all Delta flights to SF. We called an audible, booked a ticket on an American Eagle flight, and hustled to another terminal, through security, onto a shuttle bus, and finally just in time onto our flight. There’s no wifi on this plane and all the delays mean my day in SF has been compressed and will be crazy as soon as I land.  So no time for a…
  • LTE in the WiFi Spectrum

    Fred Wilson
    2 Mar 2015 | 9:17 am
    Apparently T-Mobile is getting ready to launch an LTE service in the unlicensed WiFi spectrum. I’ve written a fair bit here at AVC over the years about the fact that unlicensed spectrum provides a path for way more innovation than licensed spectrum. I am a big fan of unlicensed spectrum and I believe that the secret to more mobile bandwidth in the coming years is more unlicensed spectrum and less licensed spectrum. I believe that auctioning off the most valuable and useful spectrum to the highest bidders, who often warehouse and under utilize it, is bad policy. This move by T-Mobile is…
  • A Note On Anonymous, Pseudonymous, Guest, and Regular Commenters

    Fred Wilson
    1 Mar 2015 | 7:15 am
    One of the best things about AVC is the engaged and active community that envelopes this blog. It has been for many years a conversation among friends and the occasional stranger. I’ve called it a bar where I get to be the bartender. The people in the community come and go. There are regulars who come every day. There are regulars who come every few days. Some come once every week or two. Some have left never to return. Some return on occasion. That’s all as it should be and quite like what goes on in the real world. I’ve always chosen to allow people to comment using a…
 
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    O'Reilly Radar - Insight, analysis, and research about emerging technologies

  • Bridging the gap in big data silos

    Jenn Webb
    5 Mar 2015 | 8:28 am
    In this Radar Podcast episode, I sit down with John Carnahan, executive vice president of data science at Ticketmaster. At our recent Strata + Hadoop World Conference in San Jose, CA, Carnahan presented a session on using data science and machine learning to improve ticket sales and marketing at Ticketmaster. I took the opportunity to chat with Carnahan about Ticketmaster's evolving approach to data analysis, the avenues of user engagement they're investigating, and how his genetics background is informing his work in the big data space. When Carnahan took the job at Ticketmaster about three…
  • Pandora’s box model

    Brian Kardell
    5 Mar 2015 | 5:00 am
    This post is part of my personal notes about the benefits currently specified in Shadow DOM, but contentious and held up in committee. We'll work it out in standards, I'm sure — but given the number of things Shadow DOM was addressing, it may still be several years until we have solutions widely implemented and deployed that solve all of them. This has me doing a lot of thought exercises about what can be done in the meantime. The following reflects one such exercise: specifically, what would it mean to solve just the styling end of this on its own. Warning: it may be mildly crazy. The…
  • Designing for technological context

    Mary Treseler
    5 Mar 2015 | 4:00 am
    Editor’s note: This is an excerpt by Matt Nish-Lapidus from our recent book Designing for Emerging Technologies, a collection of works by several authors and edited by Jon Follett. This excerpt is included in our curated collection of chapters from the O’Reilly Design library. Download a free copy of the Designing for the Internet of Things ebook here. [caption id="attachment_74387" align="alignright" width="237"] Download the free ebook.[/caption]Bruce Sterling wrote in Shaping Things that the world is becoming increasingly connected, and the devices by which we are connecting are…
  • Four short links: 5 March 2015

    Nat Torkington
    5 Mar 2015 | 3:00 am
    The Web's Grain (Frank Chimero) -- What would happen if we stopped treating the web like a blank canvas to paint on, and instead like a material to build with? Bruce Sterling on Convergence of Humans and Machines -- I like to use the terms “cognition” and “computation”. Cognition is something that happens in brains, physical, biological brains. Computation is a thing that happens with software strings on electronic tracks that are inscribed out of silicon and put on fibre board. They are not the same thing, and saying that makes the same mistake as in earlier times, when people said…
  • How CI removes the pain

    Neal Ford
    4 Mar 2015 | 3:15 pm
    I've given a continuous delivery workshop a few times with ThoughtWorks Chief Scientist Martin Fowler, who tells an interesting story about continuous integration, from the first software project he ever saw. When Martin was a teenager, his father had a friend who was running a software project, and he gave Martin the nickel (or five pence) tour — a bunch of men, predominately on mainframe terminals, working in an old warehouse. Martin remarked that the thing that struck him the most was when the guide told him that all the developers were "currently integrating all their code." They…
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    TechCrunch

  • Signal Keeps Your iPhone Calls And Texts Safe From Government Spies

    Sarah Buhr
    5 Mar 2015 | 5:21 pm
     Don’t want someone else handing your text messages, pictures, video or phone conversations over to the government? There’s an app for that. An app called Signal is a project out of Open Whisper Systems, a not-for-profit collective of hackers dedicated to making it harder for prying government eyes to get a hold of your information. It gets high marks from both the American Civil… Read More
  • If You Run A Facebook Page, Expect The Like Count To Drop Soon

    Greg Kumparak
    5 Mar 2015 | 4:14 pm
     Do you run a Facebook Page? Heads up: your page’s “Like” count is probably going to drop a bit soon, and it’s totally not your fault. The short version: Facebook is changing the way it’s counting likes, subtracting any accounts that have been either manually deactivated or “memorialized” after its owner passed. It’s something that probably… Read More
  • The Hidden Co-Founder

    Suranga Chandratillake
    5 Mar 2015 | 4:00 pm
     It was Valentine’s Day recently and that reminded me of a story I often share with the founders we work with, here at Balderton. One Friday in Cambridge, a few years ago: a tech guy and his fiancée are planning their wedding, which is due to take place in the city a few months later. Scheduled that day were: checking out the wedding venue, meeting people involved with the service,… Read More
  • Springleap Aims To Rethink Marketing Research With New Backing From Cross Border Angels

    Anthony Ha
    5 Mar 2015 | 3:25 pm
     Startup Springleap says it can help marketers improve their ad campaigns by tapping into a community of 180,000 creative professionals. To pursue that vision, the company is announcing that it has raised an additional $650,000 in seed funding, bringing its total backing to around $1.1 million. I got on the phone with founder Eran Eyal partly to discuss the funding, but more to discuss the… Read More
  • This Week On The TechCrunch Bitcoin Podcast: Do You Even Invest?

    Alex Wilhelm,John Biggs
    5 Mar 2015 | 2:29 pm
     Hello and welcome back to another episode of TCBTC, TechCrunch’s bitcoin podcast. This time around, myself and John Biggs kick over the news that a new bitcoin-facing investment vehicle is getting itself put together and public. Can it help bitcoin achieve greater price stability over time? Also joining us is Jameson Lopp of BitGo, who broke down the finer technical points of paper… Read More
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    Scripting News

  • JavaScript in-browser almost complete

    5 Mar 2015 | 5:54 am
    As you may know, I've become a JavaScript-in-the-browser developer. My liveblog is an example of that. It's an app, just like the stuff we used to develop for Mac and Windows, but it runs in the browser. The browser is a complete app environment except for one crucial piece: storage. It has a simple facility called localStorage, which almost fits the bill, comes close, but ultimately doesn't do what people want. I have solved the problem in a generic and open source way. In a very popular server platform, Node.js. However it's not widely known that this problem has been solved. Try this…
  • Every reporter should be able to start a blog

    2 Mar 2015 | 7:28 am
    Please read Ken Silverstein's piece, his story of First Look Media. Watching them stay silent for so long, I suspected they lacked basic publishing ability. It made no sense to me. You can set up a blog on wordpress.com or Tumblr, with a custom domain, in at most a couple of hours. Anyone with basic tech knowledge could do this. With all the talk about learning to code, and the digital native generation, it's kind of appalling that they can't do something as basic as create their own blog, to navigate around any blockage from their management. Silverstein says, as others have, that there was…
  • Problem with Scripting News in Firefox?

    27 Feb 2015 | 2:23 pm
    I was working with Doc Searls this afternoon, and saw how Scripting News looks in the version of Firefox he has running on his laptop. It looks awful. One tab is visible all scrunched up in a corner of the window. I have the latest Firefox on my Mac and it looks fine. All the tabs are where they are. If you're seeing the problem on your system and have any idea what the problem might be, please leave a comment below. It really bothers me that what Doc is seeing is so awful.
  • Excuse the sales pitch

    27 Feb 2015 | 8:51 am
    First, thank you for reading this blog. Now I want to try to sell you on an idea. The idea: Supporting the open web. Everywhere you look things are getting siloized, but for some reason, I must be an idiot, but I keep making software that gives users the freedom to choose. If my software isn't the best for you, now or at any time in the future, you can switch to whatever you like. I make it because I dream of a world where individuals have power over their own lives, and can help inform each other, and not be owned by companies who just want to sell them stuff they don't want or need. I work…
  • This, this! is why we love basketball

    25 Feb 2015 | 8:33 am
    Hear what Kobe Bryant thinks.
 
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    craigconnects

  • #20yrscraigslist: one lesson regarding trolls and customer service

    Craig Newmark
    3 Mar 2015 | 8:58 am
    (Note to self: get better at this, then better.)
  • 20 years of craigslist, a reflection by an old-school nerd

    Craig Newmark
    25 Feb 2015 | 11:23 am
    Sunday school, over fifty years ago, I learn that I should know when enough is enough. In 1999, I re-articulate that to myself: no one needs a billion dollars. A year later, people help me understand that, as a manager, I suck. So, I hire someone smarter than me to run the company, and stick with customer service. Few years ago, as I grow useless, I see that everyone else in customer service is smarter than me, and maybe I need a break from abuse. So, I focus on lightweight customer service. (Most of my time otherwise is public service and philanthropy.) Everyday, I’m reminded that we help…
  • Female Founders Take On the Startup World

    Craig Newmark
    24 Feb 2015 | 3:06 pm
    Hey, this past weekend my team and I were really impressed by the tweets from the #FemaleFounders Conference. This is the real deal. Y Combinator, founded by Jessica Livingston and Paul Graham, just hosted the second Female Founders Conference, where women shared their stories and practical advice for building a company. If you're ready to take action, another event coming up that's focused on Women Startups will be the Women Startup Challenge and TeleSummit, hosted by Women Who Tech. You can get involved. As a nerd, and I've said this before, I don't believe in…
  • 6 Women Rocking Tech for Good

    Craig Newmark
    20 Feb 2015 | 11:29 am
    Folks, I figure it's really important to highlight women who are really making positive changes across the tech sector. These people aren't often given the recognition they deserve. If you're able, please support 'em and follow them on Twitter. They're the real deal. 1. Jessica Greenwalt, CoFounder & Lead Designer of CrowdMed Follow @jessgreenwalt While in high school, she started a freelance design company which grew into an international design and web development firm, then Founded Pixelkeet, the world's only "parakeet run" graphic design &…
  • Protecting the Internet via the upcoming FCC vote

    Craig Newmark
    17 Feb 2015 | 11:17 am
    Okay, long story short, this is about saving the Net for regular people, versus providing privileges for companies that spend lots of money lobbying in Washington and misinforming the American public. The deal is that on February 26th, the FCC will vote on rules that promote strong Net Neutrality, which is about a level playing field so that regular people can compete with companies that prefer privilege over competition. John Oliver makes it simple: We’re talking about about what they call reclassifying Internet service provides as “Title II telecommunications services.” Specifically,…
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